In ancient mythology, one cultural feature of the barbarians is silence conceived as the impossibility to use a civilized language. The cinematic translations of Euripides' Medea and of Shakespeare's Titus Andronicus both use a visual representation of silence to show some voiceless talk that somehow involve the barbarians. In Pasolini's movie, the barbarian Medea talks intensely with Jason without any word; in Julie Taymor's film Titus, Lavinia, raped and mutilated of her tongue by the sons of the barbarian queen Tamora, silently complains about her tormentors through the book that contains the ovidian tale of Philomela.

I loquaci silenzi filmici di Medea e Lavinia. Medea di Pier Paolo Pasolini e Titus di Julie Taymor.

DANESE, ROBERTO MARIO
2015

Abstract

In ancient mythology, one cultural feature of the barbarians is silence conceived as the impossibility to use a civilized language. The cinematic translations of Euripides' Medea and of Shakespeare's Titus Andronicus both use a visual representation of silence to show some voiceless talk that somehow involve the barbarians. In Pasolini's movie, the barbarian Medea talks intensely with Jason without any word; in Julie Taymor's film Titus, Lavinia, raped and mutilated of her tongue by the sons of the barbarian queen Tamora, silently complains about her tormentors through the book that contains the ovidian tale of Philomela.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11576/2629477
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