The indoor spaces of the Urbino Colleges are noteworthy for at least two reasons, i.e. that they are keeping the original functioning as it it was planned by De Carlo, and that they show a relevant intertwining between architecture and interior design, that should be studied deep. De Carlo designed the buildings in all their parts with a meticulousness that, when acknowledged, highlights the importance given to the details and witnesses the cultural background of the whole project. There is a plenty of drawings, sketches and other documents about the project, collected in a large part by the Archivio Progetti IUAV in Venice. In fact, the research stems from this detailed documentation with the aim of developing a handbook for each item, useful to support the restoration process. The team focused on single rooms, organized in blocks of 8 rooms each and common toilets and kitchen. Each room is equipped with a furnishings set functionally designed by the architect so that the whole environment proves suitable for the students' living habits. Both private and common spaces are provided with furnishings that are adjustable and customizable according to the different needs of each student. If spaces and objects are constantly changing and used in different ways, it's essential to provide a documentation that put in relation the furnishings' current state of conservation with their measures and loading gauge, their manufacturing and any change made over time. This kind of relational database is a fundamental step to plan the conservation actions and schedule the maintenance so that the space-object pair could work correctly as a whole. The furnishings' state of conservation – in some cases dramatically influenced by severe damages – pushed us to test a methodology for the analysis and for the intervention plan based on the integration of different data visualization and managing approaches in the digital environment. The overall examination of the 'system room' is based on the analysis of each piece of furniture present in the D6C room, Aquilone College. The investigation focused on this room's furnishings, yet never missing the spatial qualities provided by the interaction between architecture and objects. The room's layout is based on a 18 square meters rectangle (6.00 x 3.00 meters), 2.50 meters high. It has a large window opening in the back wall. By entering the room the left-proper wall is constructed entirely of bricks that recall the external facades. The right-proper side is whitewashed with a sponge effect, as well as the ceiling. The lighting system is made by two lamps, one in the vestibule and the other at the center of the room. In the lobby, against the wall, a small cabinet is given the function of kitchen with a fridge and two hot plates, while on the opposite wall a door opens on the bathroom. Within the room each item can be moved and arranged in different ways. De Carlo carefully selected and designed the furnishings in a way that prevents the end user from a routine and standardized application. Accordingly, the analysis of the furniture was drawn more on the technical features than on the aesthetic ones. A first phase of basic research concerned a deep study of the original drawings kept by Archivio Progetti IUAV in Venice. By comparing the projects and the actual state of the furniture we identified what items have been substituted or removed from the room. According to this information and the consequent observations, we identified three categories of furnishings, i.e. functioning, substituted or new ones and decommissioned. The second step involved the operational intervention in situ. Each item was disassembled and its parts measured and catalogued in descriptive tables. By understanding how the different parts have been assembled and are operating it was possible to identify all the building materials and the technical solutions the architect adopted. In short, this analytical phase is organized in three steps: the historical investigation, the survey about measures and materials and the enquiry on the aesthetic shapes and the objects' use.

Rilievo e mappatura degli arredi di una camera

Laura Baratin
;
Francesca Gasparetto
;
Alessandra Cattaneo
;
Alice Devecchi
2019-01-01

Abstract

The indoor spaces of the Urbino Colleges are noteworthy for at least two reasons, i.e. that they are keeping the original functioning as it it was planned by De Carlo, and that they show a relevant intertwining between architecture and interior design, that should be studied deep. De Carlo designed the buildings in all their parts with a meticulousness that, when acknowledged, highlights the importance given to the details and witnesses the cultural background of the whole project. There is a plenty of drawings, sketches and other documents about the project, collected in a large part by the Archivio Progetti IUAV in Venice. In fact, the research stems from this detailed documentation with the aim of developing a handbook for each item, useful to support the restoration process. The team focused on single rooms, organized in blocks of 8 rooms each and common toilets and kitchen. Each room is equipped with a furnishings set functionally designed by the architect so that the whole environment proves suitable for the students' living habits. Both private and common spaces are provided with furnishings that are adjustable and customizable according to the different needs of each student. If spaces and objects are constantly changing and used in different ways, it's essential to provide a documentation that put in relation the furnishings' current state of conservation with their measures and loading gauge, their manufacturing and any change made over time. This kind of relational database is a fundamental step to plan the conservation actions and schedule the maintenance so that the space-object pair could work correctly as a whole. The furnishings' state of conservation – in some cases dramatically influenced by severe damages – pushed us to test a methodology for the analysis and for the intervention plan based on the integration of different data visualization and managing approaches in the digital environment. The overall examination of the 'system room' is based on the analysis of each piece of furniture present in the D6C room, Aquilone College. The investigation focused on this room's furnishings, yet never missing the spatial qualities provided by the interaction between architecture and objects. The room's layout is based on a 18 square meters rectangle (6.00 x 3.00 meters), 2.50 meters high. It has a large window opening in the back wall. By entering the room the left-proper wall is constructed entirely of bricks that recall the external facades. The right-proper side is whitewashed with a sponge effect, as well as the ceiling. The lighting system is made by two lamps, one in the vestibule and the other at the center of the room. In the lobby, against the wall, a small cabinet is given the function of kitchen with a fridge and two hot plates, while on the opposite wall a door opens on the bathroom. Within the room each item can be moved and arranged in different ways. De Carlo carefully selected and designed the furnishings in a way that prevents the end user from a routine and standardized application. Accordingly, the analysis of the furniture was drawn more on the technical features than on the aesthetic ones. A first phase of basic research concerned a deep study of the original drawings kept by Archivio Progetti IUAV in Venice. By comparing the projects and the actual state of the furniture we identified what items have been substituted or removed from the room. According to this information and the consequent observations, we identified three categories of furnishings, i.e. functioning, substituted or new ones and decommissioned. The second step involved the operational intervention in situ. Each item was disassembled and its parts measured and catalogued in descriptive tables. By understanding how the different parts have been assembled and are operating it was possible to identify all the building materials and the technical solutions the architect adopted. In short, this analytical phase is organized in three steps: the historical investigation, the survey about measures and materials and the enquiry on the aesthetic shapes and the objects' use.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11576/2671177
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