Auto-degradation of collagen matrices occurs in resin-infiltrated dentine by the slow action of host-derived matrix metalloproteinases. As phosphoric acid-etching inactivates these endogenous enzymes, it is puzzling how hybrid layers created by simplified etch-and-rinse adhesives can degrade in vivo. This study tested the null hypothesis that there are no differences in the relative proteolytic activities of mineralised dentine, acid-etched dentine, and etch-and-rinse adhesivetreated acid-etched dentine. Powdered dentine prepared from extracted human teeth was treated with 17% EDTA, 10% phosphoric acid, or with five simplified etch-and-rinse adhesives that were applied to 10% phosphoric acid-etched dentine. The gelatinolytic activity of the dentine powder was assayed using fluorescein-labelled gelatine. TEM examination of the air-dried, treated dentine powder was performed to confirm the presence of remnant mineralised dentine after acid-etching. 17% EDTA significantly reduced the relative proteolytic activity (73.2%) of the untreated mineralised dentine powder (control), while 10% phosphoric acid-etched dentine exhibited the highest reduction (98.1%). Treating the acid-etched dentine powder with any of the five simplified etch-and-rinse adhesives resulted in the reactivation of the proteolytic activity, with a significant negative linear correlation (Po0:05) between the increases in fluorescence and the corresponding pH values of the adhesives. It is concluded that simplified etch-and-rinse adhesives can reactivate endogenous enzymatic activities in dentine that are previously inactivated by phosphoric acid-etching. The amount of enzyme reactivated may even exceed the original quantity present in untreated mineralised dentine. This provides an explanation for the degradation of hybrid layers after acid-etched dentine matrices are infiltrated with these adhesives.

Reactivation of inactivated endogeneous proteolytic activities in phosphoric acid-etched dentine by etche-and-rinse adhesives

MANNELLO, FERDINANDO;
2006

Abstract

Auto-degradation of collagen matrices occurs in resin-infiltrated dentine by the slow action of host-derived matrix metalloproteinases. As phosphoric acid-etching inactivates these endogenous enzymes, it is puzzling how hybrid layers created by simplified etch-and-rinse adhesives can degrade in vivo. This study tested the null hypothesis that there are no differences in the relative proteolytic activities of mineralised dentine, acid-etched dentine, and etch-and-rinse adhesivetreated acid-etched dentine. Powdered dentine prepared from extracted human teeth was treated with 17% EDTA, 10% phosphoric acid, or with five simplified etch-and-rinse adhesives that were applied to 10% phosphoric acid-etched dentine. The gelatinolytic activity of the dentine powder was assayed using fluorescein-labelled gelatine. TEM examination of the air-dried, treated dentine powder was performed to confirm the presence of remnant mineralised dentine after acid-etching. 17% EDTA significantly reduced the relative proteolytic activity (73.2%) of the untreated mineralised dentine powder (control), while 10% phosphoric acid-etched dentine exhibited the highest reduction (98.1%). Treating the acid-etched dentine powder with any of the five simplified etch-and-rinse adhesives resulted in the reactivation of the proteolytic activity, with a significant negative linear correlation (Po0:05) between the increases in fluorescence and the corresponding pH values of the adhesives. It is concluded that simplified etch-and-rinse adhesives can reactivate endogenous enzymatic activities in dentine that are previously inactivated by phosphoric acid-etching. The amount of enzyme reactivated may even exceed the original quantity present in untreated mineralised dentine. This provides an explanation for the degradation of hybrid layers after acid-etched dentine matrices are infiltrated with these adhesives.
File in questo prodotto:
Non ci sono file associati a questo prodotto.

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11576/1883945
Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? ND
  • Scopus 331
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? 299
social impact