Volcanogenic sediments are widespread in the Tertiary litostratigraphic units of the circum-mediterranean area and they are representative of periods of intense volcanically-induced sedimentation, penecontemporaneous to the development of calcalkaline arc systems. With regard to the Northern Apennine, only few scattered remnants of the volcanic activity that developed during Tertiary time are actually preserved. The volcanic clasts within the Canetolo Unit represent one of these coarse remnants and provide a good chance to investigate the petrological and geochemical features of Tertiary magmatism associated with the apenninic subduction/collisional system. This work focus on the petrography and geochemistry of the volcanic clasts from the Aveto-Petrignacola Formation (Canetolo Unit), in the internal part of the apenninic chain, with emphasis on the possible relationships between geochemical affinities of the magmas and the circum-mediterranean geodynamic context. The Aveto-Petrignacola Formation consists of a thick sedimentary sequence of prevailing redeposited volcaniclastic rocks. Lithic fragments of volcanic origin are dominant (65-80 vol.%), whereas other lithologies (plutonic, metamorphic and sedimentary rocks) are subordinate and essentially derived from the erosion of a basement and a sedimentary cover. The Aveto-Petrignacola volcanic suite includes basalt, basaltic andesite, andesite, dacite lavas, and dacite to rhyolite ignimbrites. Geochemically, the Aveto-Petrignacola suite forms a continuum in composition with a wide range of SiO2 (48-73 wt.%) and all lithologies could be considered co-magmatic. The rocks seem to be related to an orogenic calc-alkaline volcanism and was produced in a subduction-related tectonic environment.

Le vulcaniti dell’unità di Canetolo nel quadro del magmatismo cenozoicodell’area circum-mediterranea

MATTIOLI, MICHELE;
2008-01-01

Abstract

Volcanogenic sediments are widespread in the Tertiary litostratigraphic units of the circum-mediterranean area and they are representative of periods of intense volcanically-induced sedimentation, penecontemporaneous to the development of calcalkaline arc systems. With regard to the Northern Apennine, only few scattered remnants of the volcanic activity that developed during Tertiary time are actually preserved. The volcanic clasts within the Canetolo Unit represent one of these coarse remnants and provide a good chance to investigate the petrological and geochemical features of Tertiary magmatism associated with the apenninic subduction/collisional system. This work focus on the petrography and geochemistry of the volcanic clasts from the Aveto-Petrignacola Formation (Canetolo Unit), in the internal part of the apenninic chain, with emphasis on the possible relationships between geochemical affinities of the magmas and the circum-mediterranean geodynamic context. The Aveto-Petrignacola Formation consists of a thick sedimentary sequence of prevailing redeposited volcaniclastic rocks. Lithic fragments of volcanic origin are dominant (65-80 vol.%), whereas other lithologies (plutonic, metamorphic and sedimentary rocks) are subordinate and essentially derived from the erosion of a basement and a sedimentary cover. The Aveto-Petrignacola volcanic suite includes basalt, basaltic andesite, andesite, dacite lavas, and dacite to rhyolite ignimbrites. Geochemically, the Aveto-Petrignacola suite forms a continuum in composition with a wide range of SiO2 (48-73 wt.%) and all lithologies could be considered co-magmatic. The rocks seem to be related to an orogenic calc-alkaline volcanism and was produced in a subduction-related tectonic environment.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11576/2299295
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