In contrast to damage of genomic DNA and despite its potential to affect cell physiology, RNA damage is a poorly examined field in biomedical research. Potential triggers of RNA damage as well as its pathophysiological implications remain largely unknown. While less lethal than mutations in genome, such non-acutely lethal insults to cells have been recently associated with underlying mechanisms of several human chronic diseases. We investigated whether RNA damage could be related to the exposure of particular xenobiotics by testing the RNA-damaging activity of a series of chemicals with different mechanisms of action. Cultured human T-lymphoblastoid cellswere treated with ethylmethanesulfonate (EMS), H2O2, doxorubicin, spermine, or S-nitroso-N-acetylpenicillamine (SNAP). Furthermore,we studied the potential protective activity of a pomegranate extract against RNA damage induced by different chemicals. Special attention has been paid to the protective mechanisms of the extract. The protective effect of pomegranate can be mediated by alterations of the rates of toxic agent absorption and uptake, by trapping of electrophiles as well as free radicals, and protection of nucleophilic sites in RNA.We used two different treatment protocols (pre- and co-treatment) for understanding the mechanism of the inhibitory activity of pomegranate.We demonstrated that total RNA is susceptible to chemical attack. A degradation of total RNA could be accomplished with doxorubicin, H2O2, spermine and SNAP. However, EMS, a well-known DNA-damaging agent, was devoid of RNA-damaging properties, while spermine and SNAP, although lacking of DNA-damaging properties, were able to damage RNA. Pomegranate reduced the RNA-damaging effect of doxorubicin, H2O2, and spermine. Its inhibitory activity could be related with its ability to forms complexes with doxorubicin and H2O2, or interacts with the intracellular formation of reactive species mediating their toxicity. For spermine, an alteration of the rates of spermine absorption and uptake can also be involved.

RNA as a new target for toxic and protective agents.

SESTILI, PIERO;BUCCHINI, ANAHI ELENA ADA;
2008

Abstract

In contrast to damage of genomic DNA and despite its potential to affect cell physiology, RNA damage is a poorly examined field in biomedical research. Potential triggers of RNA damage as well as its pathophysiological implications remain largely unknown. While less lethal than mutations in genome, such non-acutely lethal insults to cells have been recently associated with underlying mechanisms of several human chronic diseases. We investigated whether RNA damage could be related to the exposure of particular xenobiotics by testing the RNA-damaging activity of a series of chemicals with different mechanisms of action. Cultured human T-lymphoblastoid cellswere treated with ethylmethanesulfonate (EMS), H2O2, doxorubicin, spermine, or S-nitroso-N-acetylpenicillamine (SNAP). Furthermore,we studied the potential protective activity of a pomegranate extract against RNA damage induced by different chemicals. Special attention has been paid to the protective mechanisms of the extract. The protective effect of pomegranate can be mediated by alterations of the rates of toxic agent absorption and uptake, by trapping of electrophiles as well as free radicals, and protection of nucleophilic sites in RNA.We used two different treatment protocols (pre- and co-treatment) for understanding the mechanism of the inhibitory activity of pomegranate.We demonstrated that total RNA is susceptible to chemical attack. A degradation of total RNA could be accomplished with doxorubicin, H2O2, spermine and SNAP. However, EMS, a well-known DNA-damaging agent, was devoid of RNA-damaging properties, while spermine and SNAP, although lacking of DNA-damaging properties, were able to damage RNA. Pomegranate reduced the RNA-damaging effect of doxorubicin, H2O2, and spermine. Its inhibitory activity could be related with its ability to forms complexes with doxorubicin and H2O2, or interacts with the intracellular formation of reactive species mediating their toxicity. For spermine, an alteration of the rates of spermine absorption and uptake can also be involved.
File in questo prodotto:
Non ci sono file associati a questo prodotto.

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11576/2302473
Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? ND
  • Scopus 16
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? 16
social impact