This study assessed the effectiveness of water immersion to the shoulders in enhancing blood lactate removal during active and passive recovery after short-duration high-intensity exercise. Seventeen cyclists underwent active water- and land-based recoveries and passive water and land-based recoveries. The recovery conditions lasted 31 minutes each and started after the identification of each cyclist's blood lactate accumulation peak, induced by a 30-second all-out sprint on a cycle ergometer. Active recoveries were performed on a cycle ergometer at 70% of the oxygen consumption corresponding to the lactate threshold (the control for the intensity was oxygen consumption), while passive recoveries were performed with subjects at rest and seated on the cycle ergometer. Blood lactate concentration was measured 8 times during each recovery condition and lactate clearance was modeled over a negative exponential function using non-linear regression. Actual active recovery intensity was compared to the target intensity (one sample t-test) and passive recovery intensities were compared between environments (paired sample t-tests). Non-linear regression parameters (coefficients of the exponential decay of lactate; predicted resting lactates; predicted delta decreases in lactate) were compared between environments (linear mixed model analyses for repeated measures) separately for the active and passive recovery modes. Active recovery intensities did not differ significantly from the target oxygen consumption, whereas passive recovery resulted in a slightly lower oxygen consumption when performed while immersed in water rather than on land. The exponential decay of blood lactate was not significantly different in water- or land-based recoveries in either active or passive recovery conditions. In conclusion, water immersion at 29°C would not appear to be an effective practice for improving post-exercise lactate removal in either the active or passive recovery modes.

Effect of water-based recovery on blood lactate removal after high-intensity exercise

LUCERTINI, FRANCESCO
;
GERVASI, MARCO;SISTI, DAVIDE;ROCCHI, MARCO BRUNO LUIGI;STOCCHI, VILBERTO;BENELLI, PIERO
2017-01-01

Abstract

This study assessed the effectiveness of water immersion to the shoulders in enhancing blood lactate removal during active and passive recovery after short-duration high-intensity exercise. Seventeen cyclists underwent active water- and land-based recoveries and passive water and land-based recoveries. The recovery conditions lasted 31 minutes each and started after the identification of each cyclist's blood lactate accumulation peak, induced by a 30-second all-out sprint on a cycle ergometer. Active recoveries were performed on a cycle ergometer at 70% of the oxygen consumption corresponding to the lactate threshold (the control for the intensity was oxygen consumption), while passive recoveries were performed with subjects at rest and seated on the cycle ergometer. Blood lactate concentration was measured 8 times during each recovery condition and lactate clearance was modeled over a negative exponential function using non-linear regression. Actual active recovery intensity was compared to the target intensity (one sample t-test) and passive recovery intensities were compared between environments (paired sample t-tests). Non-linear regression parameters (coefficients of the exponential decay of lactate; predicted resting lactates; predicted delta decreases in lactate) were compared between environments (linear mixed model analyses for repeated measures) separately for the active and passive recovery modes. Active recovery intensities did not differ significantly from the target oxygen consumption, whereas passive recovery resulted in a slightly lower oxygen consumption when performed while immersed in water rather than on land. The exponential decay of blood lactate was not significantly different in water- or land-based recoveries in either active or passive recovery conditions. In conclusion, water immersion at 29°C would not appear to be an effective practice for improving post-exercise lactate removal in either the active or passive recovery modes.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11576/2648323
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