Introduction: Recent studies found physiological and psychometric differences, in elite basketball (Moreira et al., 2012a) and jiu-jitsu (Moreira et al., 2012b) athletes, between official (OC) and simulated competitions (SC). Archery is a sport characterized by only one automated technical skill (Tursi and Napolitano, 2014) that lasts just few seconds, thus it is easy to simulate a competition with research purposes. However, to our knowledge no studies evaluated any difference between archery OC and SC and this does not allow to use SCs instead of OCs in research settings. The present study aimed to assess if archers’ performances differ between OC and SC. The influence of different train- ing regimens was evaluated as well Methods: 24 male athletes (age 22.8±2.1; BMI 23.7±2.1) with at least 4 years of archery experience were recruited and their performances (i.e. total score) were recorded during an OC and a SC, before and after 3 different training (6 months) regimens (subjects were randomly assigned to the groups). The first group underwent solely a specific technical training program (3 sessions per week, 90 min per session). The other groups also engaged (3 sessions per week, 90 min per session) in either a resistance training program based on weight machines only (group 2) or a specific training program characterized by elastic bands and calisthenics exercises aimed at simulating the shooting technique. In order to assess if the type of competition could affect the performance, the total scores of the OC and SC performed before the training periods were compared using a 2-tailed paired sample t-test. Thereafter, a mixed between-within subjects ANOVA was run to assess if the performance, during OC or SC competitions (within factor), was influenced by the type of training (between factor) and/or the time (within factor), i.e. before and after training. Alpha was set at 0.05. Results: No statistical difference (p=0.969) was found between the pre-training scores of OC (520.08±11.16) and SC (520.13±11.05), which resulted strongly (r=0.89) and significantly correlated (p<0.001). Also, training type, time, and time x type interaction did not affect the scores of OC and SC, which always resulted not significantly different. Discussion: The results highlight that conducting an OC or a SC to evaluate the athletes’ performance yield similar results and those results do not seem to be influenced by training. Therefore, archery SCs appear to be well representative of OCs, regardless the training program used. Hence, SCs could be used instead of OCs in research settings. References: Tursi D, Napolitano S. (2014). Technical movements in archery. J Hum Sport Exerc, 9:S570-5 Moreira A, McGuigan M, et al. (2012a). Monitoring Internal Load Parameters During Simulated and Official Basketball Matches. J Strength Cond Res, 26:861-6 Moreira A, Franchini E, et al. (2012b). Salivary Cortisol and Immunoglobulin A Responses to simulated and Official Jiu-Jitsu Matches. J Strength Cond Res, 26:2185-91

Performance does not differ between official and simulated archery competitions

MONZONI R.
;
LUCERTINI F.;FERRI MARINI;FEDERICI ARIO
2017-01-01

Abstract

Introduction: Recent studies found physiological and psychometric differences, in elite basketball (Moreira et al., 2012a) and jiu-jitsu (Moreira et al., 2012b) athletes, between official (OC) and simulated competitions (SC). Archery is a sport characterized by only one automated technical skill (Tursi and Napolitano, 2014) that lasts just few seconds, thus it is easy to simulate a competition with research purposes. However, to our knowledge no studies evaluated any difference between archery OC and SC and this does not allow to use SCs instead of OCs in research settings. The present study aimed to assess if archers’ performances differ between OC and SC. The influence of different train- ing regimens was evaluated as well Methods: 24 male athletes (age 22.8±2.1; BMI 23.7±2.1) with at least 4 years of archery experience were recruited and their performances (i.e. total score) were recorded during an OC and a SC, before and after 3 different training (6 months) regimens (subjects were randomly assigned to the groups). The first group underwent solely a specific technical training program (3 sessions per week, 90 min per session). The other groups also engaged (3 sessions per week, 90 min per session) in either a resistance training program based on weight machines only (group 2) or a specific training program characterized by elastic bands and calisthenics exercises aimed at simulating the shooting technique. In order to assess if the type of competition could affect the performance, the total scores of the OC and SC performed before the training periods were compared using a 2-tailed paired sample t-test. Thereafter, a mixed between-within subjects ANOVA was run to assess if the performance, during OC or SC competitions (within factor), was influenced by the type of training (between factor) and/or the time (within factor), i.e. before and after training. Alpha was set at 0.05. Results: No statistical difference (p=0.969) was found between the pre-training scores of OC (520.08±11.16) and SC (520.13±11.05), which resulted strongly (r=0.89) and significantly correlated (p<0.001). Also, training type, time, and time x type interaction did not affect the scores of OC and SC, which always resulted not significantly different. Discussion: The results highlight that conducting an OC or a SC to evaluate the athletes’ performance yield similar results and those results do not seem to be influenced by training. Therefore, archery SCs appear to be well representative of OCs, regardless the training program used. Hence, SCs could be used instead of OCs in research settings. References: Tursi D, Napolitano S. (2014). Technical movements in archery. J Hum Sport Exerc, 9:S570-5 Moreira A, McGuigan M, et al. (2012a). Monitoring Internal Load Parameters During Simulated and Official Basketball Matches. J Strength Cond Res, 26:861-6 Moreira A, Franchini E, et al. (2012b). Salivary Cortisol and Immunoglobulin A Responses to simulated and Official Jiu-Jitsu Matches. J Strength Cond Res, 26:2185-91
978-3-9818414-0-4
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11576/2656890
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