Aim: The purpose of this study was to explore correlates of physical activity (PA) in school-aged children, particularly investigating parental correlates in a socio-ecological approach [1], taking into account multidimensional factors. To examine the roles of supportive social environments on children’s active living could provide a clearer understanding of the correlates and the determinants of children decisions to be physically active, and represent a key element in the development of effective policies aimed at the promotion of children health and well-being [2]. Method: Eighty-seven fourth-grade children (boys=47, girls=40) and both their parents were involved in this study. They completed a package of questionnaires and a subgroup of 54 children, fathers and mothers, wore a triaxial accelerometer (GT3X+ ActiGraph) for 7 consecutive days. Personal (gender, socioeconomic status, ethnicity), individual (self-efficacy, enjoyment, importance of PA), social (parental support), environmental variables (equipment accessibility and neighbourhood safety) and self-reported PA were investigated. Average minutes of moderate to vigorous PA (>3 METs) per day (MVPA) was considered from accelerometers. Results: A positive significant correlation was found between children’s self-reported PA and perceived parental support, self-efficacy, enjoyment, and importance of PA (p< .01). Children’s perceived parental support and self-efficacy were seen to be significant predictors of children’s PA (p< .01). Moreover children’s perceived parental support was positively and significantly associated with father’s self-reported PA, importance, and enjoyment of PA (p< .01). Significant differences were found by gender on children’s MVPA, girls (31.7 min/day, SD=16.3) were less active than boys (53.4 min/day, SD=23.6). Girls MVPA during weekend days resulted in a positive significant correlation with MVPA of their fathers. Furthermore, children’s MVPA during weekend days was significantly higher (p< .05) among those children whom mother and father have an history of PA in the past. MVPA was also significantly higher for children with non Italian ethnicity parents. Conclusion: Concerning the role of parents in active living, these findings are in line with those of scientific literature reporting that perceived parental support is a key element in school-aged children’s PA and that father’s role seems to be of particular importance. It would be of a great relevance for future research to investigate effects on children’s PA of educational intervention programs focused on parents. References [1] Sallis JF et al. (2008) Ecological models of health behavior (3rd ed.) In: Glanz K et al. (Eds.), Health Behavior and health education: Theory, research and practice (465-485) San Francisco: Jossey-Bass. [2] O'Connor T et al. (2009) Engaging parents to increase youth physical activity: A systematic review. American Journal of Preventive Medicine, 37(2), 1410-1149.

Parental correlates of physical activity among fourth-grade children

Erica Gobbi;
2013-01-01

Abstract

Aim: The purpose of this study was to explore correlates of physical activity (PA) in school-aged children, particularly investigating parental correlates in a socio-ecological approach [1], taking into account multidimensional factors. To examine the roles of supportive social environments on children’s active living could provide a clearer understanding of the correlates and the determinants of children decisions to be physically active, and represent a key element in the development of effective policies aimed at the promotion of children health and well-being [2]. Method: Eighty-seven fourth-grade children (boys=47, girls=40) and both their parents were involved in this study. They completed a package of questionnaires and a subgroup of 54 children, fathers and mothers, wore a triaxial accelerometer (GT3X+ ActiGraph) for 7 consecutive days. Personal (gender, socioeconomic status, ethnicity), individual (self-efficacy, enjoyment, importance of PA), social (parental support), environmental variables (equipment accessibility and neighbourhood safety) and self-reported PA were investigated. Average minutes of moderate to vigorous PA (>3 METs) per day (MVPA) was considered from accelerometers. Results: A positive significant correlation was found between children’s self-reported PA and perceived parental support, self-efficacy, enjoyment, and importance of PA (p< .01). Children’s perceived parental support and self-efficacy were seen to be significant predictors of children’s PA (p< .01). Moreover children’s perceived parental support was positively and significantly associated with father’s self-reported PA, importance, and enjoyment of PA (p< .01). Significant differences were found by gender on children’s MVPA, girls (31.7 min/day, SD=16.3) were less active than boys (53.4 min/day, SD=23.6). Girls MVPA during weekend days resulted in a positive significant correlation with MVPA of their fathers. Furthermore, children’s MVPA during weekend days was significantly higher (p< .05) among those children whom mother and father have an history of PA in the past. MVPA was also significantly higher for children with non Italian ethnicity parents. Conclusion: Concerning the role of parents in active living, these findings are in line with those of scientific literature reporting that perceived parental support is a key element in school-aged children’s PA and that father’s role seems to be of particular importance. It would be of a great relevance for future research to investigate effects on children’s PA of educational intervention programs focused on parents. References [1] Sallis JF et al. (2008) Ecological models of health behavior (3rd ed.) In: Glanz K et al. (Eds.), Health Behavior and health education: Theory, research and practice (465-485) San Francisco: Jossey-Bass. [2] O'Connor T et al. (2009) Engaging parents to increase youth physical activity: A systematic review. American Journal of Preventive Medicine, 37(2), 1410-1149.
File in questo prodotto:
Non ci sono file associati a questo prodotto.

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11576/2679304
Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? ND
  • Scopus ND
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? ND
social impact