The present work provides arguments for the involvement of anti-vector immunity and of SARS-CoV-2 variants on the efficacy of ChAdOx1 nCoV-19 vaccine. First, it is suggested that anti-vector immunity takes place as homologous vaccination with ChAdOx1 nCoV-19 vaccine is applied and interferes with vaccine efficacy when the interval between prime and booster doses is less than 3 months. Second, longitudinal studies suggest that ChAdOx1 nCoV-19 vaccine provides suboptimal efficacy against SARS-CoV-2 Alpha variant, which appears to have an increased transmissibility among vaccinated people. At the moment, ChAdOx1 nCoV-19 vaccine is able to reduce the severity of symptoms and transmissibility. However, if the vaccinated individuals do not maintain physical preventive measures, they could turn into potential spreaders, thus suggesting that mass vaccination will not quickly solve the pandemic. Possible consequences of SARS-CoV-2 evolution and of repeated anti-SARS-CoV-2 vaccinations are discussed and adoption of an influenza-like vaccination strategy is suggested.

Hypothesis: Possible influence of antivector immunity and SARS-CoV-2 variants on efficacy of ChAdOx1 nCoV-19 vaccine

Zamai, Loris
;
Rocchi, Marco B L
2021

Abstract

The present work provides arguments for the involvement of anti-vector immunity and of SARS-CoV-2 variants on the efficacy of ChAdOx1 nCoV-19 vaccine. First, it is suggested that anti-vector immunity takes place as homologous vaccination with ChAdOx1 nCoV-19 vaccine is applied and interferes with vaccine efficacy when the interval between prime and booster doses is less than 3 months. Second, longitudinal studies suggest that ChAdOx1 nCoV-19 vaccine provides suboptimal efficacy against SARS-CoV-2 Alpha variant, which appears to have an increased transmissibility among vaccinated people. At the moment, ChAdOx1 nCoV-19 vaccine is able to reduce the severity of symptoms and transmissibility. However, if the vaccinated individuals do not maintain physical preventive measures, they could turn into potential spreaders, thus suggesting that mass vaccination will not quickly solve the pandemic. Possible consequences of SARS-CoV-2 evolution and of repeated anti-SARS-CoV-2 vaccinations are discussed and adoption of an influenza-like vaccination strategy is suggested.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11576/2691003
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