Some inscriptional evidence mentions the ethnonym Dripsinates and the toponym Dripsinum. The two terms refer to a population of pre-Roman origin and its administrative centre respectively. The ancient toponym Dripsinum has been linked to the modern toponym Trissino, which designates a town located in the valley of the river Agno, to the west of Vicenza (ancient Vicetia). The Dripsinates may have been one of the Euganeae gentes mentioned by Cato and Pliny the Elder, who had been assigned to the jurisdiction of neighbouring major towns in 89 BCE: Dripsinates should have been adtributi to Vicetia. Later on, perhaps in Augustan age, Dripsinates acquired self-governing status: the civitas Dripsinatium was thus ruled by duumvirs and aediles, and its citizens were enrolled in the Collina tribe. Echoes of a possible controversy over the self-governance of the Dripsinates involving the inhabitants of Vicetia in the Late Roman Republic may be found in a passage from Decimus Junius Brutus Albinus’ letter to Cicero, dated to May 21st, 43 BCE. By investigating the case-study as a whole, this paper aims to shed light on the process of integration of indigenous peoples into the Roman administrative system in North-East Italy.

Indigeni e integrazione in Cisalpina: il caso dei Dripsinates

Franco Luciani
2021-01-01

Abstract

Some inscriptional evidence mentions the ethnonym Dripsinates and the toponym Dripsinum. The two terms refer to a population of pre-Roman origin and its administrative centre respectively. The ancient toponym Dripsinum has been linked to the modern toponym Trissino, which designates a town located in the valley of the river Agno, to the west of Vicenza (ancient Vicetia). The Dripsinates may have been one of the Euganeae gentes mentioned by Cato and Pliny the Elder, who had been assigned to the jurisdiction of neighbouring major towns in 89 BCE: Dripsinates should have been adtributi to Vicetia. Later on, perhaps in Augustan age, Dripsinates acquired self-governing status: the civitas Dripsinatium was thus ruled by duumvirs and aediles, and its citizens were enrolled in the Collina tribe. Echoes of a possible controversy over the self-governance of the Dripsinates involving the inhabitants of Vicetia in the Late Roman Republic may be found in a passage from Decimus Junius Brutus Albinus’ letter to Cicero, dated to May 21st, 43 BCE. By investigating the case-study as a whole, this paper aims to shed light on the process of integration of indigenous peoples into the Roman administrative system in North-East Italy.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11576/2694583
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