Delivering physical activity in cancer care requires knowledge, competence, and specific skills to adapt the exercise program to the patients' specific needs. Kinesiology students could be one of the main stakeholders involved in the promotion of physical activity. This study aims to investigate the knowledge, perception, and competence about exercise in patients with oncological disease in a sample of students attending the Sports Science University. A total of 854 students (13% response rate) from four Italian universities completed the online survey between May and June 2021. About half of the study participants identified the correct amount of aerobic (44%) and strength (54%) activities proposed by the American College of Sports Medicine for patients with cancer. Almost all the students recognized the importance of physical activity in cancer prevention (96%), in the management of cancer before surgery (96%), during anticancer treatments (84%), and after therapies completion (98%). On the contrary, they reported a lack of university courses dedicated to cancer diseases, psychological implications, and prescription of physical activity in all types of cancer prevention. Overall, few students felt qualified in delivered counseling about physical activity and individual or group-based exercise programs in patients with cancer. Logistic regression revealed that the students attending the Master's Degree in Preventive and Adapted Physical Activity were more likely to have knowledge and competence than other students. The present study suggests that kinesiology universities should increase the classes and internships about exercise oncology to train experts with specific skills who are able to adequately support patients in their lifestyle modification.

Kinesiology Students' Perception Regarding Exercise Oncology: A Cross-Sectional Study

Ferri Marini, Carlo;Natalucci, Valentina;Barbieri, Elena;Lucertini, Francesco;
2022

Abstract

Delivering physical activity in cancer care requires knowledge, competence, and specific skills to adapt the exercise program to the patients' specific needs. Kinesiology students could be one of the main stakeholders involved in the promotion of physical activity. This study aims to investigate the knowledge, perception, and competence about exercise in patients with oncological disease in a sample of students attending the Sports Science University. A total of 854 students (13% response rate) from four Italian universities completed the online survey between May and June 2021. About half of the study participants identified the correct amount of aerobic (44%) and strength (54%) activities proposed by the American College of Sports Medicine for patients with cancer. Almost all the students recognized the importance of physical activity in cancer prevention (96%), in the management of cancer before surgery (96%), during anticancer treatments (84%), and after therapies completion (98%). On the contrary, they reported a lack of university courses dedicated to cancer diseases, psychological implications, and prescription of physical activity in all types of cancer prevention. Overall, few students felt qualified in delivered counseling about physical activity and individual or group-based exercise programs in patients with cancer. Logistic regression revealed that the students attending the Master's Degree in Preventive and Adapted Physical Activity were more likely to have knowledge and competence than other students. The present study suggests that kinesiology universities should increase the classes and internships about exercise oncology to train experts with specific skills who are able to adequately support patients in their lifestyle modification.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11576/2702510
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