During the past decades, 3D printing has revolutionised different areas of research. Despite the considerable progress achieved in 3D printing of pharmaceuticals, the limited choice of suitable materials remains a challenge to overcome. The growing search for sustainable excipients has led to an increasing interest in biopolymers. Poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) (PHB) is a biocompatible and biodegradable biopolymer obtained from bacteria that could be efficiently employed in the pharmaceutical field. Here we aimed to demonstrate its potential application as a thermoplastic material for personalised medicine through 3D printing. More specifically, we processed PHB by using direct powder extrusion, a one-step additive manufacturing technique. To assess and denote the feasibility and versatility of the process, a 3D square model was manufactured in different dimensions (sidexheight: 12x2 mm; 18x2 mm; 24x2 mm) and loaded with increasing percentages of a model drug (up to 30% w/w). The manufacturing process was influenced by the drug content, and indeed, an increase in the amount of the drug determined a reduction in the printing temperature, without affecting the other parameters (such as the layer height). The composition of the model squares was investigated using Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, the resulting spectra confirmed that the starting materials were successfully incorporated into the final formulations. The thermal behaviour of the printed systems was characterized by differential scanning calorimetry, and thermal gravimetric analysis. Moreover, the sustained drug release profile of the formulations was performed over 21 days and showed to be dependent on the dimensions of the printed object and on the amount of loaded drug. Indeed, the formulation with 30% w/w in the dimension 24x2 mm released the highest amount of drug. Hence, the results suggested that PHB and direct powder extrusion technique could be promising tools for the manufacturing of prolonged release and personalised drug delivery forms.

Poly(3-hydroxybutyrate): A potential biodegradable excipient for direct 3D printing of pharmaceuticals

Moroni, Sofia;Khorshid, Shiva;Aluigi, Annalisa;Tiboni, Mattia
;
Casettari, Luca
2022

Abstract

During the past decades, 3D printing has revolutionised different areas of research. Despite the considerable progress achieved in 3D printing of pharmaceuticals, the limited choice of suitable materials remains a challenge to overcome. The growing search for sustainable excipients has led to an increasing interest in biopolymers. Poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) (PHB) is a biocompatible and biodegradable biopolymer obtained from bacteria that could be efficiently employed in the pharmaceutical field. Here we aimed to demonstrate its potential application as a thermoplastic material for personalised medicine through 3D printing. More specifically, we processed PHB by using direct powder extrusion, a one-step additive manufacturing technique. To assess and denote the feasibility and versatility of the process, a 3D square model was manufactured in different dimensions (sidexheight: 12x2 mm; 18x2 mm; 24x2 mm) and loaded with increasing percentages of a model drug (up to 30% w/w). The manufacturing process was influenced by the drug content, and indeed, an increase in the amount of the drug determined a reduction in the printing temperature, without affecting the other parameters (such as the layer height). The composition of the model squares was investigated using Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, the resulting spectra confirmed that the starting materials were successfully incorporated into the final formulations. The thermal behaviour of the printed systems was characterized by differential scanning calorimetry, and thermal gravimetric analysis. Moreover, the sustained drug release profile of the formulations was performed over 21 days and showed to be dependent on the dimensions of the printed object and on the amount of loaded drug. Indeed, the formulation with 30% w/w in the dimension 24x2 mm released the highest amount of drug. Hence, the results suggested that PHB and direct powder extrusion technique could be promising tools for the manufacturing of prolonged release and personalised drug delivery forms.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11576/2702511
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