Listeriosis is a foodborne disease caused by Listeria monocytogenes species and is known to cause severe complications, particularly in pregnant women, young children, the elderly, and immunocompromised individuals. The aim of this study was to investigate the presence of Listeria species in food and water using both biochemical and species-specific PCR analysis. L. monocytogenes isolates were further screened for the presence of various antibiotic resistance, virulence, and biofilmforming determinants profiles using phenotypic and genotypic assays. A total of 207 samples (composed of meat, milk, vegetables, and water) were collected and analyzed for presence of L. monocytogenes using species specific PCR analysis. Out of 267 presumptive isolates, 53 (19.85%) were confirmed as the Listeria species, and these comprised 26 L. monocytogenes, 3 L. innocua, 2 L. welshimeri, and 1 L. thailandensis. The remaining 21 Listeria species were classified as uncultured Listeria, based on 16SrRNA sequence analysis results. A large proportion (76% to 100%) of the L. monocytogenes were resistant to erythromycin (76%), clindamycin (100%), gentamicin (100%), tetracycline (100%), novobiocin (100%), oxacillin (100%), nalidixic acid (100%), and kanamycin (100%). The isolates revealed various multi-drug resistant (MDR) phenotypes, with E-DA-GM-T-NO-OX-NA-K being the most predominant MDR phenotypes observed in the L. monocytogenes isolates. The virulence genes prfA, hlyA, actA, and plcB were detected in 100%, 68%, 56%, and 20% of the isolates, respectively. In addition, L. monocytogenes isolates were capable of forming strong biofilm at 4 C (%) after 24 to 72 h incubation periods, moderate for 8% isolates at 48 h and 20% at 72 h (p < 0.05). Moreover, at 25 C and 37 C, small proportions of the isolates displayed moderate (8–20%) biofilm formation after 48 and 72 h incubation periods. Biofilm formation genes flaA and luxS were detected in 72% and 56% of the isolates, respectively. These findings suggest that proper hygiene measures must be enforced along the food chain to ensure food safety.

Evidence of VirulentMulti-Drug Resistant and Biofilm-Forming Listeria Species Isolated from Various Sources in South Africa

Giulia Amagliani
Membro del Collaboration Group
;
Giuditta Fiorella Schiavano
Membro del Collaboration Group
;
Giulia Baldelli
Membro del Collaboration Group
;
Giorgio Brandi
Membro del Collaboration Group
;
2022

Abstract

Listeriosis is a foodborne disease caused by Listeria monocytogenes species and is known to cause severe complications, particularly in pregnant women, young children, the elderly, and immunocompromised individuals. The aim of this study was to investigate the presence of Listeria species in food and water using both biochemical and species-specific PCR analysis. L. monocytogenes isolates were further screened for the presence of various antibiotic resistance, virulence, and biofilmforming determinants profiles using phenotypic and genotypic assays. A total of 207 samples (composed of meat, milk, vegetables, and water) were collected and analyzed for presence of L. monocytogenes using species specific PCR analysis. Out of 267 presumptive isolates, 53 (19.85%) were confirmed as the Listeria species, and these comprised 26 L. monocytogenes, 3 L. innocua, 2 L. welshimeri, and 1 L. thailandensis. The remaining 21 Listeria species were classified as uncultured Listeria, based on 16SrRNA sequence analysis results. A large proportion (76% to 100%) of the L. monocytogenes were resistant to erythromycin (76%), clindamycin (100%), gentamicin (100%), tetracycline (100%), novobiocin (100%), oxacillin (100%), nalidixic acid (100%), and kanamycin (100%). The isolates revealed various multi-drug resistant (MDR) phenotypes, with E-DA-GM-T-NO-OX-NA-K being the most predominant MDR phenotypes observed in the L. monocytogenes isolates. The virulence genes prfA, hlyA, actA, and plcB were detected in 100%, 68%, 56%, and 20% of the isolates, respectively. In addition, L. monocytogenes isolates were capable of forming strong biofilm at 4 C (%) after 24 to 72 h incubation periods, moderate for 8% isolates at 48 h and 20% at 72 h (p < 0.05). Moreover, at 25 C and 37 C, small proportions of the isolates displayed moderate (8–20%) biofilm formation after 48 and 72 h incubation periods. Biofilm formation genes flaA and luxS were detected in 72% and 56% of the isolates, respectively. These findings suggest that proper hygiene measures must be enforced along the food chain to ensure food safety.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11576/2703550
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