In mussel (Mytilus sp.) hemocytes, differential functional responses to injection with different types of live and heat-killed Vibrio species have been recently demonstrated. In this work, responses of Mytilus hemocytes to heat-killedVibrio splendidus LGP32 and the mechanisms involved were investigated in vitro and the results were compared with those obtained with Vibrio anguillarum (ATCC 19264). Adhesion of hemocytes after incubation with bacteria was evaluated by flow cytometry: both total hemocyte counts (THC) and percentage of hemocyte sub-populations were determined in non-adherent cells. Functional parameters such as lysosomal membrane stability, lysozyme release, extracellular ROS production and NO production were evaluated, as well as the phosphorylation state of the stress-activated p38 MAPK and PKC. Neither Vibrio affected total hemocyte adhesion, while both induced similar lysosomal destabilization and NO production. However, V. splendidus decreased adhesion of large granulocytes, induced rapid and persistent lysozyme release and stimulated extracellular ROS production: these effects were associated with persistent activation of p38 MAPK and PKC. In contrast, V. anguillarum decreased adhesion of large semigranular hemocytes and increased that of hyalinocytes,had no effect on the extracellular ROS production, and induced significantly lower lysozyme release and phosphorylation of p-38 MAPK and PKC than V. splendidus. These data reinforced the existence of specific interactions between mussel hemocytes and V. splendidus LGP32 and suggest that this Vibrio strain affects bivalve hemocytes through disregulation of immune signaling. The results support the hypothesis that responses of bivalve hemocytes to different bacterial stimuli may depend not only on the nature of the stimulus, but also on the cell subtype, thus leading to differential activation of signaling components.

Specificity of anti-Vibrio immune response through p38 MAPK and PKC activation in the hemocytes of the mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis.

CIACCI, CATERINA;BETTI, MICHELE;CANONICO, BARBARA;CITTERIO, BARBARA;CANESI, LAURA
2010-01-01

Abstract

In mussel (Mytilus sp.) hemocytes, differential functional responses to injection with different types of live and heat-killed Vibrio species have been recently demonstrated. In this work, responses of Mytilus hemocytes to heat-killedVibrio splendidus LGP32 and the mechanisms involved were investigated in vitro and the results were compared with those obtained with Vibrio anguillarum (ATCC 19264). Adhesion of hemocytes after incubation with bacteria was evaluated by flow cytometry: both total hemocyte counts (THC) and percentage of hemocyte sub-populations were determined in non-adherent cells. Functional parameters such as lysosomal membrane stability, lysozyme release, extracellular ROS production and NO production were evaluated, as well as the phosphorylation state of the stress-activated p38 MAPK and PKC. Neither Vibrio affected total hemocyte adhesion, while both induced similar lysosomal destabilization and NO production. However, V. splendidus decreased adhesion of large granulocytes, induced rapid and persistent lysozyme release and stimulated extracellular ROS production: these effects were associated with persistent activation of p38 MAPK and PKC. In contrast, V. anguillarum decreased adhesion of large semigranular hemocytes and increased that of hyalinocytes,had no effect on the extracellular ROS production, and induced significantly lower lysozyme release and phosphorylation of p-38 MAPK and PKC than V. splendidus. These data reinforced the existence of specific interactions between mussel hemocytes and V. splendidus LGP32 and suggest that this Vibrio strain affects bivalve hemocytes through disregulation of immune signaling. The results support the hypothesis that responses of bivalve hemocytes to different bacterial stimuli may depend not only on the nature of the stimulus, but also on the cell subtype, thus leading to differential activation of signaling components.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11576/2502439
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