The general election of 2013 marked a ‘turning point’. Voting indecision was significantly higher than in the past while voting choices were made later, with the proportion of ‘late deciders’ and ‘last-minute voters’ growing as compared with 2008 and 2006. Voters’ willingness to change their votes was this time reflected in their actual choices. A more open attitude towards the political offerings was also apparent and this generated a degree of interest in the campaign that was greater than at any time in the previous 10 years. The configuration of parties among which voters were called upon to choose was very different as compared with previous elections. By describing and taking these features as its point of departure, this article explores the behaviour of voters during the course of the election campaign and analyses their decision-making processes from the perspective of when they made up their minds. The analysis then focuses on a new political entity, the Five-star Movement (MoVimento 5 Stelle), and on who voted for it. As one of the competitors it was successful in providing representation for the anti-political sentiments widespread among the Italian electorate. The Five-star Movement was also able to capitalise on the climate of voting indecision, spearheading the widespread demand for political renewal. It gained such electoral advantages from this that it became the most-voted party, posing a strong challenge to Italy’s bipolar party system.

The election campaign and the ‘last-minute’ deciders

CECCARINI, LUIGINO;DIAMANTI, ILVO
2013-01-01

Abstract

The general election of 2013 marked a ‘turning point’. Voting indecision was significantly higher than in the past while voting choices were made later, with the proportion of ‘late deciders’ and ‘last-minute voters’ growing as compared with 2008 and 2006. Voters’ willingness to change their votes was this time reflected in their actual choices. A more open attitude towards the political offerings was also apparent and this generated a degree of interest in the campaign that was greater than at any time in the previous 10 years. The configuration of parties among which voters were called upon to choose was very different as compared with previous elections. By describing and taking these features as its point of departure, this article explores the behaviour of voters during the course of the election campaign and analyses their decision-making processes from the perspective of when they made up their minds. The analysis then focuses on a new political entity, the Five-star Movement (MoVimento 5 Stelle), and on who voted for it. As one of the competitors it was successful in providing representation for the anti-political sentiments widespread among the Italian electorate. The Five-star Movement was also able to capitalise on the climate of voting indecision, spearheading the widespread demand for political renewal. It gained such electoral advantages from this that it became the most-voted party, posing a strong challenge to Italy’s bipolar party system.
File in questo prodotto:
Non ci sono file associati a questo prodotto.

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11576/2565981
Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? ND
  • Scopus ND
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? ND
social impact