Purpose There is growing evidence of an association between physical activity and a reduced risk of cancer and cancer recurrence. The aim of this study was to assess the effects of exercise-conditioned human serum (HS) effects on the proliferative and tumorigenic potential of triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) and prostate cancer (PC) cells. Moreover, modulated mechanisms and several physiological factors that can predict exercise effects were investigated. Methods Thirty healthy sedentary subjects were recruited for the study. The subjects performed two high-intensity endurance cycling (HIEC) sessions before and after a nine-week period of high-intensity interval training (HIIT). Cell tumorigenic capacity affected by HS collected before (t0), immediately after (t1), 4 h (t2), and 24 h (t3) after the HIEC sessions was evaluated by in vitro three-dimensional colony formation. The modulation of molecular pathways was analyzed by western blotting and qPCR in TNBC and PC cells, and in TNBC xenografts in exercised mice. Results All of the HIEC-conditioned HS (t1, t2, and t3) markedly impacted the proliferative and the microtumor-forming capacity of both TNBC and PC cell lines, while the HS collected from the subjects at rest did not. Modulation of the Hippo and Wnt/beta-catenin pathways by HIEC-conditioned HS before and after the period of HIIT was shown. Multiple linear regression analysis showed relationships between the effects of HIEC-conditioned HS in PC cells, lactate threshold and VO2max. Conclusions These results highlight the potential of HIEC bouts in tumor progression control and the importance of optimizing an approach to identify physiological predictors of the effects of acute exercise in tertiary cancer prevention.

The effects of human sera conditioned by high-intensity exercise sessions and training on the tumorigenic potential of cancer cells

Baldelli, Giulia;De Santi, Mauro
;
Gervasi, M.;Annibalini, G.;Sisti, D.;Sestili, P.;Barbieri, Elena;Brandi, Giorgio
2020

Abstract

Purpose There is growing evidence of an association between physical activity and a reduced risk of cancer and cancer recurrence. The aim of this study was to assess the effects of exercise-conditioned human serum (HS) effects on the proliferative and tumorigenic potential of triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) and prostate cancer (PC) cells. Moreover, modulated mechanisms and several physiological factors that can predict exercise effects were investigated. Methods Thirty healthy sedentary subjects were recruited for the study. The subjects performed two high-intensity endurance cycling (HIEC) sessions before and after a nine-week period of high-intensity interval training (HIIT). Cell tumorigenic capacity affected by HS collected before (t0), immediately after (t1), 4 h (t2), and 24 h (t3) after the HIEC sessions was evaluated by in vitro three-dimensional colony formation. The modulation of molecular pathways was analyzed by western blotting and qPCR in TNBC and PC cells, and in TNBC xenografts in exercised mice. Results All of the HIEC-conditioned HS (t1, t2, and t3) markedly impacted the proliferative and the microtumor-forming capacity of both TNBC and PC cell lines, while the HS collected from the subjects at rest did not. Modulation of the Hippo and Wnt/beta-catenin pathways by HIEC-conditioned HS before and after the period of HIIT was shown. Multiple linear regression analysis showed relationships between the effects of HIEC-conditioned HS in PC cells, lactate threshold and VO2max. Conclusions These results highlight the potential of HIEC bouts in tumor progression control and the importance of optimizing an approach to identify physiological predictors of the effects of acute exercise in tertiary cancer prevention.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11576/2677078
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