Many authors underline that there has been a profound evolution of tourism consumption from the Fordist era to the post Fordist and post modern one that we could place within a paradigmatic leap in terms of size and quality of contexts and type of demand. The first was precisely the product of economic development pushed by the end of World War II, with longer paid holidays, extensive initial use of cars and increased purchasing power of people. Thistype of tourism represented mass tourism, characterized by standardized supply and demand, in which price and economies of scale were criticalsuccessfactorsto satisfy themasses oftourists emerging fromthe thirty-year economic growth of the US and Europe. After the first oil crises and the advent of globalization, together with the emergence of new technologies, new segments of tourists emerge, in possession of economic, cultural and temporal capital that have given rise to post-Fordist consumption and demand phenomena. Here we detect the "paradigmatic leap" with tourists looking for unique 103 products, differentiated in line with emerging lifestyles by mixing psychological and aesthetic, cognitive and imaginative, perceptual and co-design factors. All in a complex process that mixes material and immaterial, experiential and spiritual factors. The demand for well-being feeds on factors that are physical, cognitive and emotional but within an ever deeper psychologicalperceptive and imaginative envelope. So we are witnessing the transition from the tourism to a post-tourismwho,highlightingstrongpersonalization(andpersonality),showsgreatervolatilityand less loyalty to the places themselves, as well as greater critical capacity. The post-tourist demands tailor-made value propositions, capable of optimizing the use of free time and enhancing the experiential dimension of the holiday where the psychological and perceptive components are a premium over the physical-material ones that had accompanied him throughout the first century tourism from the first decades of the 19th century onwards in England which accelerated industrial production and the first forms of modern welfare state were sketched in connection with the first levers oriented to the well-being of people and communities as well as the environment.

Pilotti, L., & Pencarelli, T. L’EVOLUZIONE DELLA DOMANDA POST-TURISTICA ESPERIENZIALE TRA MATERIALE, IMMATERIALE E SPIRITUALE: ALLA RICERCA DEL “BENESSERE TOTALE” NELL’INTEGRATED TRIPLE LOOP PSICOLOGIA COGNITIVA-PERCEZIONE COPROGETTAZIONE.

TONINO PENCARELLI
2021-01-01

Abstract

Many authors underline that there has been a profound evolution of tourism consumption from the Fordist era to the post Fordist and post modern one that we could place within a paradigmatic leap in terms of size and quality of contexts and type of demand. The first was precisely the product of economic development pushed by the end of World War II, with longer paid holidays, extensive initial use of cars and increased purchasing power of people. Thistype of tourism represented mass tourism, characterized by standardized supply and demand, in which price and economies of scale were criticalsuccessfactorsto satisfy themasses oftourists emerging fromthe thirty-year economic growth of the US and Europe. After the first oil crises and the advent of globalization, together with the emergence of new technologies, new segments of tourists emerge, in possession of economic, cultural and temporal capital that have given rise to post-Fordist consumption and demand phenomena. Here we detect the "paradigmatic leap" with tourists looking for unique 103 products, differentiated in line with emerging lifestyles by mixing psychological and aesthetic, cognitive and imaginative, perceptual and co-design factors. All in a complex process that mixes material and immaterial, experiential and spiritual factors. The demand for well-being feeds on factors that are physical, cognitive and emotional but within an ever deeper psychologicalperceptive and imaginative envelope. So we are witnessing the transition from the tourism to a post-tourismwho,highlightingstrongpersonalization(andpersonality),showsgreatervolatilityand less loyalty to the places themselves, as well as greater critical capacity. The post-tourist demands tailor-made value propositions, capable of optimizing the use of free time and enhancing the experiential dimension of the holiday where the psychological and perceptive components are a premium over the physical-material ones that had accompanied him throughout the first century tourism from the first decades of the 19th century onwards in England which accelerated industrial production and the first forms of modern welfare state were sketched in connection with the first levers oriented to the well-being of people and communities as well as the environment.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11576/2693371
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