: This work sheds light on the recent evolution (≈1915-2015 AD) of Sepetiba Bay (SB; SE Brazil), a subtropical coastal lagoon on the southwestern Brazilian coast, based on a multiproxy approach. Variations in geochemical proxies as well as textural, mineralogical and geochronological data allow us to reconstruct temporally constrained changes in the depositional environments along the SP3 sediment core collected from the central area of SB. At the beginning of the twentieth century, the substrate of the study site was composed of coarse-grained sediments, largely sourced from felsic rocks of proximal areas and deposited under moderate to strong shallow marine hydrodynamics. Since the 1930s, the study area has undergone silting and received high contributions of materials from mafic rocks sourced by river basins. The SP3 core reveals a shallowing-upward sequence due to human-induced silting with significant eutrophication since the middle of 1970, which was caused by significant enrichment of organic matter that was provided by not only marine productivity but also continental and human waste. In addition, the sediments deposited after 1980 exhibit significant enrichment and are moderately to strongly polluted by Cd and Zn. Metals were dispersed by hydrodynamics from the source areas, but diagenetic processes promoted their retention in the sediments. The potential ecological risk index (PERI) indicates that the level of high (considerable) ecological risk is in sediments deposited in ≈1995 (30-32 cm; subsurface). The applied methodology allowed us to understand the thickness of the bottom sediment affected by eutrophication processes and contaminants. Identical methodologies can be applied in other coastal zones, and can provide useful information to decision makers and stakeholders that manage those areas.

Long-term eutrophication and contamination of the central area of Sepetiba Bay (SW Brazil)

Frontalini, Fabrizio;
2021-01-01

Abstract

: This work sheds light on the recent evolution (≈1915-2015 AD) of Sepetiba Bay (SB; SE Brazil), a subtropical coastal lagoon on the southwestern Brazilian coast, based on a multiproxy approach. Variations in geochemical proxies as well as textural, mineralogical and geochronological data allow us to reconstruct temporally constrained changes in the depositional environments along the SP3 sediment core collected from the central area of SB. At the beginning of the twentieth century, the substrate of the study site was composed of coarse-grained sediments, largely sourced from felsic rocks of proximal areas and deposited under moderate to strong shallow marine hydrodynamics. Since the 1930s, the study area has undergone silting and received high contributions of materials from mafic rocks sourced by river basins. The SP3 core reveals a shallowing-upward sequence due to human-induced silting with significant eutrophication since the middle of 1970, which was caused by significant enrichment of organic matter that was provided by not only marine productivity but also continental and human waste. In addition, the sediments deposited after 1980 exhibit significant enrichment and are moderately to strongly polluted by Cd and Zn. Metals were dispersed by hydrodynamics from the source areas, but diagenetic processes promoted their retention in the sediments. The potential ecological risk index (PERI) indicates that the level of high (considerable) ecological risk is in sediments deposited in ≈1995 (30-32 cm; subsurface). The applied methodology allowed us to understand the thickness of the bottom sediment affected by eutrophication processes and contaminants. Identical methodologies can be applied in other coastal zones, and can provide useful information to decision makers and stakeholders that manage those areas.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11576/2693913
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